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Police Unit To Enforce Copyright Law Launched

POLICE UNIT TO ENFORCE COPYRIGHT LAW

The initiative, born out of a partnership between URSB, the Uganda Police Force and the Uganda Federation of Movie Industry (UFMI), will implement the copyright law which has been in existence since 2006 but with no enforcement

 

Artistes march ahead of signing of a memorandum of understanding to enforce the copyright law in Kampala on Friday. PHOTO BY MICHAEL KAKUMIRIZI 

By Emmanuel Ainebyoona

Kampala.

Government has agreed to form a police unit to crackdown on copyright fraudsters.

The unit will be in charge of arresting people who infringe on intellectual property, including patents, trademarks and copyright, created by musicians, artists, authors and other innovators.

At the same time, the Uganda Registration Services Bureau (URSB) launched a hologram, a symbol which will be used by Collective Management Organisations and police to identify and differentiate original audio-visual products from pirated ones.

The initiative, born out of a partnership between URSB, the Uganda Police Force and the Uganda Federation of Movie Industry (UFMI), will implement the copyright law which has been in existence since 2006 but with no enforcement.

Speaking at the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding to establish the Intellectual Property Enforcement Unit in Kampala on Friday, the Minister of Justice and Constitutional Affairs, Maj Gen Kahinda Otafiire, said government is responsible for administering intellectual property issues.

“When you go to downtown Kampala, you find good-for-nothing fellows benefiting from the sweat of creators. You will find Chameleon’s (Joseph Mayanja) songs on Compact Discs being sold by individuals who make a lot of money yet the creator is getting nothing,’” Maj Gen Otafiire said.

He added that an effectively enforced intellectual property infrastructure is necessary to ensure the stimulation of investment in innovation and to avoid commercial-scale intellectual property rights infringements. 

Mr Bemanya Twebaze, the registrar general at USRB, said enforcement of copyright law will lead to creation of employment opportunities and also widen the tax base through revenue collection.

Inspector General of Police Kale Kayihura, who was represented by the director of human rights and legal services, Mr Erasmus Twaruhuka, promised to educate police officers and the public on the importance of respecting creative works.

Mr Bonny Kasujja, the director of UFMI, welcomed the creation of the enforcement unit, saying they will ensure no audio-visual works are consumed for free.

“Time has come for those who have been pirating our work to approach us and get proper work, by buying it to encourage us create more,” Andrew Benon Kibuka, head of the Federation of Performing Artists.

Source http://www.monitor.co.ug/News/National/Police-unit-to-enforce-copyright-law/-/688334/3257188/-/10gwbdvz/-/index.html

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